Monday, July 3, 2017

Ecocriticism and Environmental Studies at IMC, Leeds

This year’s International Medieval Congress has more sessions related to environment and ecocriticism than any individual can possibly attend, a strong testament to the fact that more people are taking climate issues seriously. Here’s a list. Please reply in the comments if I’ve missed any papers or sessions that should be here.

MONDAY 03 JULY 2017: 11.15-12.45

Session 112 University House: Great Woodhouse Room
THE MEDIEVAL LANDSCAPE / SEASCAPE, I: MEMORY AND COMMUNITY, Landscape Research Group, Oxford
Organizer: Karl Christian Alvestad, Department of History, University of Winchester and Kimm Curran, School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow; Moderator: Kimm Curran
”Memory, Landscape, and a Coastal Community in 13th- and 14th-Century England,” Miriam Muller, Centre for the Study of the Middle Ages, University of Birmingham
”By Boat and Boots: Using Fieldwork and Place Names to Map a Medieval Coastline,” Leonie Dunlop, School of Humanities, University of Glasgow
”Trowbridge Castle: Continuity and Change through Time,” Therron Welstead, School of Archaeology, History & Anthropology, University of Wales Trinity Saint David
”Topographical Legacies of Monasticism: Evolving Perceptions and Realities of Monastic Landscapes in the South-Eastern Welsh Marches,” Eddie Procter, Department of Archaeology, University of Exeter

Session 113 Maurice Keyworth Building: Room 1.09
BORDERS AND BORDERLANDS IN MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN EUROPE, I: CULTURAL IDENTITY AND OTHERNESS ON THE MEDIEVAL BORDERS OF WALES, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bristol
Organizer: Helen Fulton, Department of English, University of Bristol; Moderator: Helen Fulton
”Gloucester’s Relations with Its Welsh Neighbours: The Religious Communities at Brecon, Ewyas, and Newport,” James G. Clark, Department of History, University of Exeter
“Reforming the Welsh Border: Sir John Price and His Commonplace Book,” Dylan Foster Evans, School of Welsh, Cardiff University
”A Hereford Hanging: Records, Reports, and Responses,” Gwen Seabourne, School of Law, University of Bristol
”The Sea as Borderland in Early Medieval Celtic Britain,” Jonathan Wooding, Department of Celtic Studies, University of Sydney

Session 117 Stage@leeds: Stage 3
STRANGE THINGS IN THE MEDIEVAL GARDEN, ^Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University / Leverhulme Trust Project ‘The Enclosed Garden: Pleasure, Contemplation & Cure in the Medieval Hortus Conclusus’
Organizer: Patricia E. Skinner, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University; Moderator: Patricia E. Skinner
“Sicily in Picardy: An Experimental Garden of the 13th Century,” Theresa Lorraine Tyers, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
“Grafting in the Garden: Gender and Queer Identities in the Hortus Conclusus,” Liz Herbert McAvoy, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
“Courtly Knights and Amazon Brides: Spaces, Faces, and Discord in The Knight’s Tale,” Maria Zygogianni, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University

MONDAY 03 JULY 2017: 14.15-15.45

Session 217 University House: Great Woodhouse Room
THE MEDIEVAL LANDSCAPE / SEASCAPE, II: LANDSCAPES OF ‘THE OTHER’ AND IDENTITY, Landscape Research Group, Oxford
Organizer: Karl Christian Alvestad, Department of History, University of Winchester and Kimm Curran, School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow; Moderator: Sam Turner, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, Newcastle University
”Where There’s a Well There’s a Way: Old English –ingas Group Identities and Negotiating Control of Land and Water in Early Anglo-Saxon England,” Robert Briggs, Institute of Archaeology, University College London
”‘Secret and distant freaks’: Constructing the Irish Other through the Landscape,” Daryl Hendley Rooney, Independent Scholar, Dublin
”Archaeological Approaches to Otherness: The Mountain as an Alternative to Monastic Communities in the Early Middle Ages,” Marta Sancho i Planas, Institut de Recerca en Cultures Medievals, Universitat de Barcelona

Session 231 Fine Arts Building: SR G.04
SPIRITUAL LANDSCAPES: MAPPING FEMALE SPIRITUALITY IN THE MIDDLE AGES, I, Institut de Recerca en Cultures Medievals, Universitat de Barcelona
Organizer: Núria Jornet-Benito, Departament de Biblioteconomia i Documentació / Institut de Recerca en Cultures Medievals, Universitat de Barcelona; Moderator: Delfi-Isabel Nieto-Isabel, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Paleografía y Diplomática, Universitat de Barcelona
”Navigating Medieval Spiritual Landscapes in the Age of Digital Humanities,” Núria Jornet-Benito
”Monastic Landscapes: Monasteries, Convents, and Nunneries in Andalusia at the End of the Middle Ages,” Silvia María Pérez González, Departamento de Geografía, Historia y Filosofía, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Sevilla
”The Monastery and Its Environment: The Use of GIS for the Study of Monastic Estates in the Middle Ages,” Xavier Costa-Badia, Institut de Recerca en Cultures Medievals, Universitat de Barcelona and Maria Soler-Sala, Departament d’Història Medieval, Paleografia i Diplomàtica, Universitat de Barcelona

Session 237 Baines Wing: Room G.36
RURAL SOCIETY IN CHARLEMAGNE’S BACKYARD, NWO Project ‘Charlemagne’s Backyard?: Rural Society in the Netherlands in the Carolingian Age – An Archaeological Perspective’
Organizer: Erik Goosmann, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht; Moderator: Mayke de Jong, Utrecht Centre for Medieval Studies, Universiteit Utrecht
”Estate Organisation in the Carolingian Netherlands: The Textual Evidence,” Erik Goosmann
”It’s a Big World After All?: Objects and the World of Connections of Rural Dwellers,” Wim Kemme, Faculteit Archeologie, Universiteit Leiden
”Charlemagne’s Palace at Nijmegen: Its Creation and Impact,” Arjan Den Braven, Faculteit Archeologie, Universiteit Leiden
Respondent: Matthew J. Innes, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London

MONDAY 03 JULY 2017: 16.30-18.00

Session 312 University House: Beechgrove Room
ENGLISH INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND THE SEA, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Culture, University of Southampton
Organizer: Peter Douglas Clarke, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Culture, University of Southampton; Moderator: Andy King, Department of History, University of Southampton
”The English Merchant Fleet, 1300-1600,” Craig Lambert, Department of History, University of Southampton
“‘For syche is my destine’: English Officials in the Château de l’Ombrière and the Gascon Wine Trade as Colonialism in the Late Medieval Period,” Robert Blackmore, Department of History, University of Southampton

Session 317 University House: Great Woodhouse Room
THE MEDIEVAL LANDSCAPE / SEASCAPE, III: MARGINAL AND LIMINAL PLACES AND SPACES, Landscape Research Group, Oxford
Organizer: Karl Christian Alvestad, Department of History, University of Winchester and Kimm Curran, School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow; Moderator: Daryl Hendley Rooney, Independent Scholar, Dublin
”The Poetics of Shifting Ground: Negotiated Boundaries in ‘Hallmundarkviða’,” Katherine Rich, Department of English & Related Literature, University of York
”Vulnerable Margins: St Guðlac and the Fens of East Anglia,” Michael Baker, Department of English Studies, Durham University
”Finnar, Bjarmar, and Other Inhabitants of the North as Magic Users in the Fornaldarsögur, c. 1200-1400,” Peter Rivard, Faculty of Humanities, University of Turku


MONDAY 03 JULY 2017: 19.00-20.00

Session 411 Great Hall
ANNUAL EARLY MEDIEVAL EUROPE LECTURE: GARDENS AND GARDENING IN EARLY MEDIEVAL SPAIN AND PORTUGAL”
Speaker: Wendy Davis, formerly University College London
Introduction: Marios Comstambeys, Department of History, University of Liverpool, and Simon MacLean, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Early Medieval Europe
Details: Although we may have an image of flowers and perfumes adorning the palaces of Andalusi Spain, gardens do not come so quickly to mind when we think about the North in the early Middle Ages. Yet northern Iberian charters often detail transactions in gardens – differentiated from arable land – and recent macro-botanical work throws some light on what was cultivated.
The Iberian peninsula is a large landmass, and it has a wide diversity of landscapes, from mountains and high plateaux to coastal lowlands and rolling forests. There is also great climatic diversity: the South has a much higher mean temperature than the centre or North, and there is great variation in rainfall, from the wet North West to the dry South East. In the early Middle Ages there was cultural diversity too: invasion of the Visigothic state by Muslim groups in the early 8th century brought Berbers and Arabs. Muslim rule was in the long run challenged by the Christian kingdoms of the North, but throughout the ups and downs of political change people occupied the landscape and worked the land. All of this makes it particularly interesting to investigate how far this land’s inhabitants managed the physical space around their homes and how far they supplemented staple foods with more personal produce.
There are many things to explore: when archaeologists designate areas of excavated settlements as gardens, what kinds of garden do they have in mind – decorative, or productive, or just somewhere to store tools? Is it reasonable to classify such spaces as ‘gardens’ at all? When 9th- and 10th-century northern texts specify gardens, do they differentiate garden from orchard and from vineyard? And, given the number of fruit trees named, did the redactors recognize any difference between garden and orchard? Although Arabic texts describe wonderful gardens in the South, how many of these texts include descriptions borrowed from writing elsewhere in the Arabic world? And, in the end, for North and South, what was grown? Were gardens significant contributors to domestic food production?

TUESDAY 04 JULY 2017: 09.00-10.30

Session 501 University House: St George Room
THE ‘OTHER’ MANUSCRIPT, I: READING AND (RE-)WRITING BODLEIAN LIBRARY MS JUNIUS 11, Centre of Late Antique & Medieval Studies, King’s College London
Organizer: Carl Kears, Department of English, King’s College London; Moderator: Carl Kears
”Reading MS Junius 11 Now,” Jill Fitzgerald, Department of English, United States Naval Academy, Maryland and Carl Kears
“Reading Genesis into Context,” Daniel Anlezark, Medieval & Early Modern Centre, University of Sydney
”Reading the Most Sacred Space: Ecocriticism, Eden, and MS Junius 11,” Jodi Grimes, College of Humanities & Social Sciences, Dallas Baptist University, Texas

Session 503 University House: Little Woodhouse Room
BIRDS, BEASTS, AND MONSTERS
Moderator: Timothy Bourns, St John’s College, University of Oxford
”Elephants Are Never Forgotten: Exotic Animals in Early Umayyad Diplomacy,” Ian D. Morris, Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies Amsterdam, Universiteit van Amsterdam
”Other Sinners?: Animals and the Papal Penitentiary,” Herwig Weigl, Institut für Österreichische Geschichtsforschung / Institut für Geschichte, Universität Wien
”Space Invaders in the John Rylands Library’s Books of Hours,” Anne Kirkham, Department of Art History & Visual Studies, University of Manchester

Session 507 Baines Wing: Room 1.13
THE PHYSICAL HORSE
Organizer: Timothy Dawson, Independent Scholar, Leeds and Anastasija Ropa, Department of Management & Communication Science, Latvian Academy of Sport Education, Riga; Moderator: John Clark, Museum of London
”Peasant Horse Breeding in Late Medieval England,” Jordan Claridge, Department of Economic History, London School of Economics & Political Science
”How to Make a White Mark on a Black Horse: Middle English Hippiatric Treatises, Common Diseases, and Their Remedies,” Elina Cotterill, Independent Scholar, Oxford
”‘Let no one sell the horse overseas’: Reflecting on the Importance of Horses in the Anglo-Saxon Law Texts,” Edgar Rops, Faculty of Law, University of Latvia, Riga

Session 529 Parkinson Building: Room 1.16
OTHERNESS, MONSTROSITY, AND DEVIATION IN OLD NORSE LITERATURE AND CULTURE, I: (WERE)WOLVES, Old Norse Network of Otherness (ONNO)
Organizer: Gwendolyne Knight, Historiska institutionen, Stockholms Universitet and Rebecca Merkelbach, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge; Moderator: Rebecca Merkelbach
”Taming the Wolf: Reading Bisclaret in Light of Old Norse Kennings,” Minjie Su, Faculty of English Language & Literature, University of Oxford
“Fearing the Wolf: Fenrisúlfr in Old Norse Mythology,” Kolfinna Jónatansdóttir, School of Humanities, University of Iceland, Reykjavík
”Categorising the (Were)Wolf: Or, Are Shapeshifters People?,” Gwendolyne Knight

TUESDAY 04 JULY 2017: 11.15-12.45

Session 621 Social Sciences Building: Room 10.07
OTHERNESS IN OLD ENGLISH LITERATURE
Moderator: Jennifer Neville, Department of English, Royal Holloway, University of London
”Reassessing Animal Otherness in Old English Literature,” Todd Preston, Department of English, Lycoming College, Pennsylvania
”Concepts of Alterity in the Old English Judith,” Karin E. Olsen, Department of English Language & Culture, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen

Session 635 Stage@leeds: Stage 1
14TH-CENTURY ENGLAND, II: PROPERTY MARKETS IN MEDIEVAL ENGLAND – ENTERPRISE AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, Society for 14th-Century Studies
Organizer: Gwilym Dodd, Department of History, University of Nottingham; Moderator: Richard Holt, Institutt for historie og religionsvitenskap, UiT Norges arktiske universitet
”Commercialisation and Property Speculation in Medieval Cambridge,” John Lee, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
”Enterprise and Urban Development in Medieval Hull,” Catherine Casson, Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester
”Property Investors in Late Medieval London,” Helen K. S. Killick, International Capital Market Association (ICMA) Centre, University of Reading

TUESDAY 04 JULY 14.15 – 15.45

Session 710 Maurice Keyworth Building: Room 1.24
MEDIEVAL ANIMALS, I: WOUNDS AND DEATHS OF BEASTS, MAD (Medieval Animal Data Network)
Organizer: Alice Choyke, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest; Moderator: Gerhard Jaritz, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest
”Wounded Dragons in the Margins of Medieval Manuscripts,” Mónica Ann Walker Vadillo, Independent Scholar, Oxford
”At the End of Animal Life: Slaughtering in Medieval Hungary,” Balázs Nagy, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest

Session 717 Maurice Keyworth Building: Room 1.05
BRITISH ARCHAEOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION, I: ‘OTHER’ IN THE LANDSCAPE, AT SEA, AND IN THE WORKSHOP, British Archaeological Association
Organizer: Harriet Mahood, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading; Moderator: Jenny Alexander, Department of the History of Art, University of Warwick
”Line, Space, Ritual, and Anglo-Saxon Identity,” Anastasia Moskvina, Department of Art History & World Art Studies, University of East Anglia
”Medieval Nordic Shipbuilding Technology: The Otherness of Craftsmanship,” Morten Ravn, Vikingeskibsmuseet, Roskilde
”Outsiders, Outside London: Foreign Building Craftsmen in the Early Tudor Period,” Charlotte Stanford, Humanities, Classics & Comparative Literature, Brigham Young University, Utah

Session 736 University House: Great Woodhouse Room
MEDIEVALISTS AND THE CLIMATE SCIENCES, I: CLIMATE AND WEATHER IN MEDIEVAL DOCUMENTARY SOURCES, Abteilung für Wirtschafts-, Sozial- und Umweltgeschichte, Universität Bern
Organizer: Heli Huhtamaa, Abteilung für Wirtschafts-, Sozial- und Umweltgeschichte, Universität Bern / Department of Geographical & Historical Studies, University of Eastern Finland; Moderator: Maximilian Schuh, Historisches Seminar, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
”From Medieval Chronicles to Climate Indices: The Example of the Burgundian Low Countries in the 15th Century,” Chantal Camenisch, Abteilung für Wirtschafts-, Sozial- und Umweltgeschichte, Universität Bern
”Drought, Famine, and Plague in Adso’s Life of St Mansuey: Topoi or Historical Events, c. 980?,” Conor Kostick, School of History, University College Dublin
”Cold, Colder, Canossa: Severe Conditions or Useful Topoi in Winter, 1076-1077,” Thomas Wozniak, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen

Session 738 Maurice Keyworth Building: Room 1.31
CIVIC IDENTITY ON THE EDGE?, I: MARGINAL LANDSCAPES AND THE MATERIAL CULTURE OF LATE MEDIEVAL HULL, University of Hull
Organizer: Sarah McKeon, Department of History, University of Hull and Elisabeth Salter, Department of English, University of Hull; Moderator: Daisy Black, School of Humanities, University of Wolverhampton
”Living on the Margins: Commons and Community in the Humber Wetlands, 1425-1600,” Briony Anne McDonagh, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Hull
”The Possessions and Civic Identities of Men and Women Who Owned, Described, and Traded Goods in Late Medieval Hull and Its Environs,” Elisabeth Salter
Respondent: Wendy R. Childs, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds

Session 739 Stage@leeds: Stage 2
EXON DOMESDAY, I: THE PROCESSES OF EXON, Haskins Society
Organizer: Chris Lewis, Institute of Historical Research, University of London / Department of History, King’s College London; Moderator: Lois Lane, Department of History, King’s College London
”Collecting geld,” Chris Lewis
”Describing Royal Estates,” Alex Dymond, Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford
”The Making and Purposes of Exon Domesday,” Stephen Baxter, St Peter’s College, University of Oxford

TUESDAY 04 JULY 2017: 16.30-18.00

Session 810 Maurice Keyworth Building: Room 1.24
MEDIEVAL ANIMALS, II: CREATING NEW KINDS OF BEASTS, MAD (Medieval Animal Data Network)
Organizer: Gerhard Jaritz, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest; Moderator: Alice Choyke, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest
”The Horses of the Others: Exotic Horses in Medieval Epic and Romance,” Levente Selaf, Department of Early Hungarian Literature, Eötvös Lorand University, Budapest
”The Bonasus, Bartholomaeus Anglicus, and Other(ing) Animals: The Making of a Curious Beast,” Zsuzsanna Papp Reed, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest

Session 836 University House: Great Woodhouse Room
MEDIEVALISTS AND THE CLIMATE SCIENCES, II: NATURAL RECORDS AS HISTORICAL SOURCE MATERIAL, HUMAN CONSEQUENCES OF CLIMATE, Abteilung für Wirtschafts-, Sozial- und Umweltgeschichte, Universität Bern
Organizer: Heli Huhtamaa, Abteilung für Wirtschafts-, Sozial- und Umweltgeschichte, Universität Bern / Department of Geographical & Historical Studies, University of Eastern Finland; Moderator: Christian Rohr, Abteilung für Wirtschafts-, Sozial- und Umweltgeschichte, Universität Bern
”Flooding Events in Premodern Nuremberg, 1400-1800: Combining Evidence from Written Sources and Stalagmites,” Maximilian Schuh, Historisches Seminar, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
”Crop Failures and Crises in Relation to Climate-Sensitive Tree-Ring Records in Medieval Finland and North-West Russia, 1100-1500,” Heli Huhtamaa
“Violence and Conflict as a Consequence of Abrupt Climatic Changes and Extreme Weather in Medieval Ireland,” Francis Ludlow, Department of History, Trinity College Dublin

Session 837 Parkinson Building: Nathan Bodington Chamber
A ‘DARK MATTER’: ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY OF FISCAL ESTATES, IV - INFLUENCES AND BEHAVIOUR, 9TH-11TH CENTURIES
Organizer: Paolo Tomei, Dipartimento di Civiltà e Forme del Sapere, Università di Pisa and Giacomo Vignodelli, Dipartimento di Storia Culture Civiltà, Università di Bologna; Moderator: Charles West, Department of History, University of Sheffield
”Conflicts over Woodland Appropriation and Expansion of Fiscal Estates in Francia, 8th and 9th Centuries,” Nicolas Schroeder, Département d’Histoire, Arts et Archéologie, Université Libre de Bruxelles
”The King’s Lands and His Neighbours in Northern Italy, 8th-10th Centuries,” Roberta Cimino, Department of History, University of Nottingham
”Lights in the Darkness?: New Data on Carolingian Public Curtes in the Arno Valley,” Federico Cantini, Dipartimento di Civiltà e Forme del Sapere, Università di Pisa


TUESDAY 04 JULY 19.00-20.00

Session 837 Parkinson Building: Nathan Bodington Chamber
A ‘DARK MATTER’: ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY OF FISCAL ESTATES, IV - INFLUENCES AND BEHAVIOUR, 9TH-11TH CENTURIES
Organizer: Paolo Tomei, Dipartimento di Civiltà e Forme del Sapere, Università di Pisa and Giacomo Vignodelli, Dipartimento di Storia Culture Civiltà, Università di Bologna; Moderator: Charles West, Department of History, University of Sheffield
”Conflicts over Woodland Appropriation and Expansion of Fiscal Estates in Francia, 8th and 9th Centuries,” Nicolas Schroeder, Département d’Histoire, Arts et Archéologie, Université Libre de Bruxelles
”The King’s Lands and His Neighbours in Northern Italy, 8th-10th Centuries,” Roberta Cimino, Department of History, University of Nottingham
”Lights in the Darkness?: New Data on Carolingian Public Curtes in the Arno Valley,” Federico Cantini, Dipartimento di Civiltà e Forme del Sapere, Università di Pisa

Session 915 Great Hall
ANNUAL MEDIEVAL ACADEMY OF AMERICA LECTURE: OUTSIDE NOAH’S ARK: SYMPATHY AND SURVIVAL AS THE WATERS RISE,”
Speaker: Jeffrey J. Cohen, Department of English, George Washington University, Washington, DC
Introduction: Helen Fulton, Department of English, University of Bristol
Medieval Academy of America
Details: A grim imagining of climate change and catastrophic deluge, the Noah story is a tale for our times. We frequently retell that narrative from Genesis as science or science fiction but too often simplify its biblical complexity. Medieval authors and illustrators found in the Vulgate version of the Flood tantalizing glimpses of stories not fully related, alternative possibilities for perspective, animal tales to companion, ambivalence to plumb, potential for ‘misplaced’ sympathetic inclinations. Focusing upon the lively retellings of the Flood narrative in Cleanness, ‘The Miller’s Tale’, and the Chester play of Noah’s Flood as well as artistic illustrations of the ark upon the inundated Earth, this talk explores the medieval impulse to find potential in cataclysm, dwelling with those whose stories do not necessarily survive.
WEDNESDAY 05 JULY 2017: 09.00-10.30

Session 1004 University House: St George Room
THE HORSE IN COURTLY LITERATURE
Organizer: Timothy Dawson, Independent Scholar, Leeds and Anastasija Ropa, Department of Management & Communication Science, Latvian Academy of Sport Education, Riga; Moderator: Edgar Rops, Faculty of Law, University of Latvia, Riga
”More Expensive than Racing Cars: The Value of Horses in Romance,” Anastasija Ropa
”Writing Bodies, Riding Equipment, Reading Horses: The Equestrian Canon and Code of Chivalry,” Karen Campbell, Department of English, Grayson College, Texas
”How to Ride before a Prince: The Rise of Riding as a Performance Art,” Jennifer Jobst, Independent Scholar, Sunset Valley, Texas

Session 1040 Emmanuel Centre: Wilson Room
FOOD AND MEDICINE IN THE MEDITERRANEAN WORLD: INDIGENOUS AND INTRODUCED SPECIES - LATE ANTIQUITY AND THE EARLY MIDDLE AGES, I, Institute for the Preservation of Medical Traditions, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC / Waldemar Ceran Research Centre for the History & Culture of the Mediterranean Area & South-East Europe Ceraneum, Łódź
Organizer: Maciej Kokoszko, Department of Byzantine History, University of Łódź; Moderator: Alain Touwaide, Institute for the Preservation of Medical Traditions, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
”Native and Introduced Plants in the Galenic Tradition,” John Wilkins, Department of Classics & Ancient History, University of Exeter
”Infant Feeding Practices: Ancient and Byzantine Sources Meet Archaeological Science,” Chryssi Bourbou, Ephorate of Antiquities of Chania, Hellenic Ministry of Culture, Athens / Institute du monde antique et byzantine, Université de Fribourg and Maciej Kokoszko
”Butter of the Greeks and the Byzantines: The Testimony of Late Antique and Byzantine Medical Sources,” Zofia Rzeźnicka, Waldemar Ceran Research Centre for the History & Culture of the Mediterranean Area & South-East Europe, University of Łódź
”Beet (Beta Vulgaris L.) in Ancient and Early Byzantine Medical Writings,” Krzysztof Jagusiak, Waldemar Ceran Research Centre for the History & Culture of the Mediterranean Area & South-East Europe, University of Łódź

WEDNESDAY 05 JULY 2017: 11.15-12.45

Session 1112 Leeds University Union: Room 6 - Roundhay
MAPPINGS, II: PRODUCING AND REPRODUCING LOCAL MAPS, ‘Cities of Readers: Religious Literacies in the Long 15th Century’ Project
Organizer: Margriet Hoogvliet, Afdeling Geschiedenis, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Felicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität Hagen and Dan Terkla, Department of English, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington; Moderator: Paul D. A. Harvey, Department of History, Durham University
”The Traditions of Geometrical Representation and the Rise of Local Mapmaking during the 14th Century and the 15th Century: Italy and South of France,” Paul Fermon, Section des Sciences Historiques et Philologiques, École Pratique des Hautes Études (EPHE), Paris
”My Plot, Your Plat, Our Inhabited Landscape: Early Modern Land Surveyors and the Record of European Physical and Social Space,” Desiree Krikken, Vakgebied Vroegmoderne Geschiedenis, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
”Using Historical Maps for GIS-Based Analysis: Religious Books in Amiens and in Nearby Towns,” Margriet Hoogvliet

Session 1117 Social Sciences Building: Room 10.07
LANDSCAPES ON THE MARGINS: SETTLEMENT, OTHERNESS, AND IDENTITY, Medieval Settlement Research Group
Organizer: Duncan Berryman, School of Geography, Archaeology & Palaeoecology, Queen’s University Belfast; Moderator: Karl Christian Alvestad, Department of History, University of Winchester
”‘In the Wastes… A Martial Kind of Men’: The Late Medieval Landscape of the Anglo-Scottish Border,” Caron Newman, McCord Centre for Landscape, Newcastle University
”Housing Animals on the Edges of Society and Settlement: On the Margins or Forming an Identity?,” Duncan Berryman
”The ‘Other’ Orsanmichele: The Development of a Florentine Civic, Commercial, and Religious Space and Its Loggias before 1337,” Marie D’Aguanno Ito, Department of History, American University, Washington, DC

Session 1121 Baines Wing: Room 1.16
ATLANTIC CRUSADES: CRUSADING IDEAS IN THE EUROPEAN CONQUEST OF THE NEW WORLD(S), 1400-1600, Northern Network for the Study of the Crusades
Organizer: Alan V. Murray, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds; Moderator: Guy Perry, St Peter’s College, University of Oxford
”Crusading Ideas and Ideology in the French Conquest of the Canary Islands,” Alan V. Murray
”The Cult of Santiago Matamoros and the Conquest of Mexico,” Alfred Andrea, Department of History, University of Vermont
”… And Meanwhile, in Peru: How the Andes Fit into Crusading,” Adam Knobler, Centrum für Religionswissenschaftliche Studien, Ruhr-Universität Bochum

Session 1140 Emmanuel Centre: Wilson Room
FOOD AND MEDICINE IN THE MEDITERRANEAN WORLD: INDIGENOUS AND INTRODUCED SPECIES - THE HIGH AND THE LATE MIDDLE AGES, II, Institute for the Preservation of Medical Traditions, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC / Waldemar Ceran Research Centre for the History & Culture of the Mediterranean Area & South-East Europe Ceraneum, Łódź
Organizer: Maciej Kokoszko, Department of Byzantine History, University of Łódź; Moderator: John Wilkins, Department of Classics & Ancient History, University of Exeter
”‘Le suc de la rosée céleste’: le miel dans la médecine antique et renaissante” (Language: Français), Magdalena Koźluk, Department of French Studies, University of Łódź
”L’amer a-t-il ses vertus?: Le citron dans la médecine antique et renaissante” (Language: Français), Jean-Paul Pittion, Trinity College Dublin / Centre d’Études Supérieures de la Renaissance, Université François-Rabelais, Tours
”Drugs, Diet, and Lifestyle in Ioannes Archiatrus, a Vernacular Greek Source,” Barbara Zipser, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
”Colchicine in Byzantine Medical Tradition: The Case of Gout’s Treatment According to Demetrios Pepagomenos’s Treatise Liber de podagra,” Michał Pawlak, Independent Scholar, Łódź

Session 1141 Stage@leeds: Stage 3
THE MARTIAL HORSE AND RIDER
Organizer: Timothy Dawson, Independent Scholar, Leeds and Anastasija Ropa, Department of Management & Communication Science, Latvian Academy of Sport Education, Riga; Moderator: Timothy Dawson
”Hunting and Fighting on Horseback According to King John I of Portugal, 1385-1433,” Ana Maria S. A. Rodrigues, Centro de História, Universidade de Lisboa
”Continuity and Change: European Horses, Horsemanship, and Material Culture from Late Antiquity to the Crusades,” Jürg Gassmann, Independent Scholar, Bühler
”The Use and Development of Bows and Crossbows as Cavalry Weapons in Medieval Europe,” John Henry Gassmann, Independent Scholar, Bühler

WEDNESDAY 05 JULY 2017: 14.15-15.45

Session 1201 Maurice Keyworth Building: Room 1.24
ANGLO-SAXON RIDDLES, II: RIDDLING NATURE, RIDDLING GENDER, The Riddle Ages
Organizer: Megan Cavell, Faculty of English Language & Literature, University of Oxford and Jennifer Neville, Department of English, Royal Holloway, University of London; Moderator: Jennifer Neville
”Of Wolves and Women: An Ecofeminist Reading of Some Exeter Book Riddles and Short Poems,” Megan Cavell
”Gender as Hyperobject in the Exeter Book Riddles,” Heide Estes, Department of English, Monmouth University, New Jersey
”Nature, Women, and the Heroic Culture of the Exeter Book Riddles,” Corinne Dale, Department of English, Royal Holloway, University of London

Session 1229 Social Sciences Building: Room 10.05
THE FAMILIAR ANIMAL AND THE ANIMAL ‘OTHER’, I: THE LITERARY ANIMAL AS FAMILIAR AND ‘OTHER’
Organizer: Sunny Harrison, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds; Moderator: Rose A. Sawyer, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
”The Role of the Non-Human Animal in Le Moniage Guillaume and Le Roman De La Manekine,” Stephanie Grace-Petinos, Graduate Center, City University of New York
”‘You see an asshead of your own, do you?’: Translation, Transformation, and the Familiar Ass as Prophetic Other in Medieval and Early Modern Representations,” Joe Ricke, Department of English, Taylor University, Indiana
”Division and Commonality in Old Icelandic Sources: Animal-Human Relations in a Society under Stress,” Harriet Jean Evans, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York

Session 1241 Stage@leeds: Stage 3
THE HORSE IN MATERIAL CULTURE
Organizer: Timothy Dawson, Independent Scholar, Leeds and Anastasija Ropa, Department of Management & Communication Science, Latvian Academy of Sport Education, Riga; Moderator: Ana Maria S. A. Rodrigues, Centro de História, Universidade de Lisboa
”Baggage Animals and Their Use: Indispensable Yet Ignored,” Timothy Dawson
”The Development of Bits from the Viking Age to the 16th Century, in England and Beyond,” John Clark, Museum of London
”Equestrian Cities: The Role of the Riding Horse in Interurban Traffic and the Characteristics of Urban Horse Husbandry in the Late Middle Ages,” Fabienne Meiers, Faculté des Lettres, des Sciences humaines, des Arts et des Sciences de l’Education, Université du Luxembourg, Belval

WEDNESDAY 05 JULY 2017: 16.30-18.00

Session 1301 Maurice Keyworth Building: Room 1.24
ANGLO-SAXON RIDDLES, III: THEORIZING AND INTERPRETING, The Riddle Ages
Organizer: Megan Cavell, Faculty of English Language & Literature, University of Oxford and Jennifer Neville, Department of English, Royal Holloway, University of London; Moderator: Jennifer Neville
”Avian Pedagogies: Wondering with Birds in the Old English Riddles,” Michael J. Warren, Department of English, Royal Holloway, University of London
”The Map of Mise-en-page: Reading Riddle 1 as a Preface to the Exeter Book Riddles,” Rachel Burns, Department of English, University College London
”Interpreting Slaves Words in the Exeter Book Riddles,” Katherine Miller, School of English, University of Leeds

Session 1329 Social Sciences Building: Room 10.05
THE FAMILIAR ANIMAL AND THE ANIMAL ‘OTHER’, II: NEGOTIATING SPECIES IN THE WIDER MEDIEVAL WORLD
Organizer: Sunny Harrison, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds; Moderator: Harriet Jean Evans, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York
”Rotting Blood and Frightened Children: Integrating Horses Into the Negotiated Spaces of Later Medieval Cities,” Sunny Harrison
”Virtuous Bees and Unprincipled Humans in Medieval China,” David Pattinson, School of Languages, Cultures & Societies - East Asian Studies, University of Leeds
”Animal Souls in Medical Theory, c. 1300,” Matthew Klemm, Department of History, Ithaca College, New York

THURSDAY 06 JULY 2017: 09.00-10.30

Session 1505 Emmanuel Centre: Room 10
WOMEN AT SEA, I
Organizer: Roberta Magnani, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University; Moderator: Rachel E. Moss, Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford
”Black Andromeda: Manuscripts, Seascapes, and Race in Medieval France,” Anna Klosowska, Department of French & Italian, Miami University, Ohio
”Queer Seas, Stranger Tides: Sea-Changing Bodies in the Digby Mary Magdalen Play,” Daisy Black, School of Humanities, University of Wolverhampton
”Chaucer’s Watery Bodies and Bodies of Water,” Roberta Magnani
“‘That swerde ys myne’: Queer Identity and Malory’s Ladies of the Lake,” Amy Louise Morgan, School of English & Languages, University of Surrey

Session 1510 Social Sciences Building: Room 10.07
WATER AND HEALTH: RELIGIOUS, SOCIAL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL PERSPECTIVES, I, Wellcome Library, London
Organizer: Elma Brenner, Wellcome Library, London; Moderator: Carole Rawcliffe, School of History, University of East Anglia
”Building Wells and Cleaning Souls: Maintaining Spiritual Health in a Late Medieval Sermon Series,” Hetta Howes, School of English & Drama, Queen Mary, University of London
”Gutters and Cesspools: Waste Water Management and Sanitation in Medieval Montpellier,” Catherine Dubé, Département d’histoire, Université de Sherbrooke, Québec and Geneviève Dumas, Département d’histoire, Université de Sherbrooke, Québec

Session 1513 Baines Wing: Room G.36
INTERACTION, IDENTITY, AND SPACE IN THE IRISH SEA, 700-1100, I: INTERACTIONS AND IDENTITIES, Irish Sea in the Middle Ages Research Network (ISMARN)
Organizer: Charles Insley, School of Arts, Languages & Cultures, University of Manchester; Moderator: Laura Gathagan, Department of History, State University of New York, Cortland
“Images of Sigurd on Crosses and Carvings from the Isle of Man, Northern Britain, and Sweden: A Scandinavian / Benedictine Connection,” Tracey-Anne Cooper, Department of History, St John’s University, Queens, New York
”11th-Century Dublin in the Irish Sea and Beyond: Hybrid Identities and Competing Connections,” Caitlin Ellis, Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse & Celtic, University of Cambridge
”A Viking Thalassocracy?: Raid, Trade, and Lordship,” Andrew Sargent, Department of History, Keele University

THURSDAY 6 JULY 11.15-12.45

Session 1605 Emmanuel Centre: Room 10
WOMEN AT SEA, II
Organizer: Rachel E. Moss, Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford; Moderator:
Roberta Magnani, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
“A Sea-Faring Woman: Gudrid and the Journeys to Vinland,” Elizabeth Cox, Department of English Literature, Swansea University
”Shipbuilders, Settlers, and Sailors: Viking Women at Sea,” April Harper, Department of History, State University of New York, Oneonta
”Maritime Protectresses in the Mediterranean: From Artemis and Victoria to Lucia and Mary,” Jessica Tearney-Pearce, Woolf Institute, Cambridge / St John’s College, University of Cambridge
”A Promise of a Safe Journey: Margery Kempe as a Talisman,” Einat Klafter, Zvi Yavetz School of Historical Studies, Tel Aviv University

Session 1612 Maurice Keyworth Building: Room 1.09
NEW PERSPECTIVES ON RURAL SETTLEMENT, II: OTHER VIEWS ON SETTLEMENTS AND LANDSCAPES, Medieval Settlement Research Group
Organizer: Duncan Berryman, School of Geography, Archaeology & Palaeoecology, Queen’s University Belfast; Moderator: Duncan Berryman
”Spatial Practice and the Construction of the ‘Other’: The Implications for Understanding the Origin and Dissolution of Common Property Regimes in Medieval England,” Ben Morton, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, Newcastle University
”Mapping Christian Debtors and Jewish Creditors in the Medieval English Landscape,” Dean Irwin, Independent Scholar, Warrington
”Crisis, Migration, and Marginality: New Evidence for the Impact of the 14th-Century Demographic Crisis on Rural Settlements,” Carenza Lewis, School of History & Heritage, University of Lincoln

Session 1636 Stage@leeds: Stage 2
A QUESTION OF TIME, II: PRODUCTION, MARKET, AND CONSUMPTION, 13TH-16TH CENTURIES
Organizer: Laura Righi, Dipartimento di Lettere e Filosofia, Università degli Studi di Trento and María Viu Fandos, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Ciencias y Técnicas Historiográficas y Estudios Árabes e Islámicos, Universidad de Zaragoza; Moderator:
Bart Lambert, Department of History, University of York
”Natural Dyes in the Middle Ages: From Farming Cycles to Market,” Mathieu Harsch, Dipartimento di Scienze storiche geografiche e dell’antichità, Università degli Studi di Padova
”The Saffron Trade in Catalonia in the 15th Century: The Exportation by German Trading Companies from the Commercial Zone of Barcelona, 1420-1462,” Iván Casado Novas, Departament d’Història i Arqueologia, Universitat de Barcelona
”From Production to Consumption: Time and Places of Alum Trade between the Late Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period,” Enrico Basso, Dipartimento di Lingue e letterature straniere e culture moderne, Università di Torino; Didier Boisseuil, Département d’histoire et d’archéologie, Université François-Rabelais, Tours; and David Igual Luis, Departamento de Historia, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Albacete

Session 1641 Emmanuel Centre: Wilson Room
SCIENCE AT COURT, II: SCHEMATA
Organizer: Tekla Bude, School of Writing, Literature & Film, Oregon State University; Moderator: Tekla Bude
”Why Should a King be Looking at the Stars?: The Moral Basis of Nicole Oresme’s Conception of Astronomy,” Sophie Serra, Centre Pierre Abélard, Université Paris IV - Sorbonne
”King Solomon as Model for Kings in 13th- and 14th-Century Royal Courts: The Case of Saint Louis (1226-1270), Alphonse X of Castile (1252-1284), and Charles V the Wise (1364-1380),” Laura Fábián, Department of Medieval & Early Modern History, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest
”Visualising Science at the Avignon Court: Time, Space, and Papal Theology in the Diagrams of Opicinus de Canistris, 1296-c. 1354,” Sarah Griffin, Kellogg College, University of Oxford

THURSDAY 06 JULY 14.15 – 15.45

Session 1729 Parkinson Building: Room B.11
MEDIEVAL ECOCRITICISMS: HUMAN AND NON-HUMAN OTHERS, Medieval Ecocriticisms
Organizer: Heide Estes, Department of English, Monmouth University, New Jersey; Moderator: Heide Estes
”Animals and Gods in Norse Mythology,” Timothy Bourns, St John’s College, University of Oxford
”Otherness as a Symbol for Corrupt Human Nature in Old Icelandic Romance: An Ecotheological Reading of Ála Flekks Saga,” Tiffany White, Department of Scandinavian, University of California, Berkeley
”Beastly Criminals or Criminal Beasts?: Animals as ‘Other’ within the Law,” Lesley MacGregor, Wolfson College, University of Oxford

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Medieval Ecocriticisms 2018: Kalamazoo, Leeds CFP

Medieval Ecocriticisms is sponsoring two sessions in summer 2018:

International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018
"Environmental Crisis and the Middle Ages (A Roundtable)"

Global environmental problems and climate change are becoming more urgent and acute, and the study of medieval art, architecture, artifacts, and documentary and literary texts can illuminate the long reach of attitudes and ideologies that have led us to current crisis. Scholars are becoming increasingly aware that environmental issues intersect with issues of race, gender, national origin, and economic power. Attitudes articulated many hundreds of years ago continue to affect current ideas about and responses to climate issues. This round-table session seeks position papers that engage with medieval representations of humans and the environment across the geographical and temporal range of the Middle Ages with attention to how reading our pasts can help us to understand the present and possibly to intervene with respect to our futures.

International Medieval Congress, Leeds, 2-5 July 2018

"Medieval Ecocriticisms"

This is a general session seeking papers on any aspect of ecocriticism from any area of medieval studies, including geographical, chronological, and field diversity, and any approach to ecocriticism: environmental studies, animal studies, thing theory, ecofeminism, and others. How can ecocriticism enrich and renew the sutdy of medieval art, history, literature, architecture, music, and other fields?How can medieval studies challenge ecocricitism? How can studying the history of human engagements with the (non-human) natural world help us understand present crisis?

Please send queries and submissions to Heide Estes at heide.estes [at] gmail.com. Deadlines for submission to both sessions is September 15, 2017.


Thursday, May 11, 2017

Eco Focused Sessions at Kalamazoo

Several sessions of potential interest to ecocritics and environmental historians have been convened for the International Congress on Medieval Studies starting this morning in at Western Michigan University. Many thanks to Ilse Schweitzer VanDonkelaar for compiling the list.


Thursday, 10:00 am

7 VALLEY I SHILLING LOUNGE (#s7)
Natura in the Twelfth Century 
Sponsor: Divinity School, Univ. of Chicago 
Organizer: Robert J. Porwoll, Univ. of Chicago 
Presider: Bernard McGinn, Univ. of Chicago
Rupert of Deutz on Nature, Sin, and the Mutability of Creation in Genesis 1 to 3 
Wanda Zemler-Cizewski, Marquette Univ.
Where Nature Indulges Herself in Secret and Distant Freaks: Creation Viewed from the Edges of the Twelfth-Century Cosmos 
Daniel Yingst, Univ. of Chicago 
The Invention of Natura: Poetry, Ecology, and Ecolinguistics in Bernard Silvestris, Alan of Lille, and Johannes de Hauvilla 
David Allison Orsbon, Univ. of Chicago
Respondent: Willemien Otten, Univ. of Chicago

15 FETZER 2030 (#15)
Archaeology of the Countryside 
Sponsor: Medieval Association for Rural Studies (MARS) 
Organizer: Adam Franklin-Lyons, Marlboro College 
Presider: Michelle Ziegler, Independent Scholar
Peasant Settlement and Agricultural Activities at Late Medieval Irish Tower House Castles 
Vicky McAlister, Southeast Missouri State Univ.
Archaeological, Palaeo-Pathological, and Palaeo-Environmental Reflections of Food Crisis in the Early Fourteenth-Century British Isles 
Philip Slavin, Univ. of Kent

29 BERNHARD 106 (#s29)
Nature versus Ecology (A Roundtable) 
Sponsor: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies 
Organizer: Shannon Gayk, Indiana Univ.–Bloomington 
Presider: Shannon Gayk
Why Not Nature? 
Kellie Robertson, Univ. of Maryland
Playing Nature on the Early English Stage 
Robert W. Barrett, Jr., Univ. of Illinois–Urbana-Champaign 
“Thus seyth the Bok of Kendys”: Ecological Thinking in the Castle of Perseverance 
Rebecca Davis, Univ. of California–Irvine
“Dwell” . . . “Magyk Natureel”: The Possibilities of Middle English Terminologies 
Emily Houlik-Ritchey, Rice Univ.
Spirited Ecology in the Treatyse of Fysshynge with an Angle 
Myra E. Wright, Bates College
Unnatural 
Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, George Washington Univ.

43 SANGREN 1730
Dwelling in the Anglo-Saxon Landscape I 
Sponsor: Richard Rawlinson Center for Anglo-Saxon Studies and 
Manuscript Research 
Organizer: Catherine E. Karkov, Univ. of Leeds 
Presider: Donald G. Scragg, Univ. of Manchester
Creating Kingdoms: Landscapes of the Living and the Dead in Anglo-Saxon England 
Sarah J. Semple, Durham Univ. 
Richard Rawlinson Center Congress Speaker
Last Writes: Death and Landscapes of Memory in Anglo-Saxon England 
Jill Hamilton Clements, Univ. of Alabama–Birmingham


Thursday, 1:30 pm

66 SCHNEIDER 1280
Gender and Species: Ecofeminist Intersections (A Roundtable) 
Organizer: Carolynn Van Dyke, Lafayette College 
Presider: Lesley Kordecki, DePaul Univ.
Does It Have to Be about Women? Feminism Goes to the Dogs 
Carolynn Van Dyke
Compassion and Benignytee: A Reassessment of the Relationship between Canacee and the Falcon in Chaucer’s Squire’s Tale 
Melissa Ridley Elmes, Lindenwood Univ. 
La Femme Bisclavret: Gender, Species, and Language 
Alison Langdon, Western Kentucky Univ.
The Owl and the Nightingale: Belligerent Mothers and the Power of Feminine Speech 
Wendy A. Matlock, Kansas State Univ.
Flying, Hunting, Reading: Feminism and Falconry 
Sara Petrosillo, Univ. of California–Davis
Questioning Gynocentric Utopia: Nature as Addict in “Farewell to Cookeham” 
Liberty S. Stanavage, SUNY–Potsdam

83 BERNHARD 211
Early Medieval Monasticisms, New Questions, New Approaches I: Monastic Landscapes 
Sponsor: Network for the Study of Late Antique and Early Medieval Monasticism 
Organizer: Matthieu van der Meer, Syracuse Univ.; Albrecht Diem, Syracuse Univ. 
Presider: Albrecht Diem
Like a Fish Out of Water: Antony the Great and the Ascetic Landscape 
Daniel Lemeni, West Univ. of Timişoara
Consider the Cook, the Baker, and the Server: The Archaeology of Monastic Kitchens from Early Byzantine Monasteries in the Near East 
Darlene L. Brooks Hedstrom, Wittenberg Univ. 
Monastic Landscapes of the Mind: Pope Gregory’s Negotiation of Greek and Latin Psychology and Demonology 
Benjamin E. Heidgerken, St. Olaf College


Thursday, 3:30 pm 

116 SCHNEIDER 1330
Gower’s Animals 
Sponsor: John Gower Society 
Organizer: Brian Gastle, Western Carolina Univ. 
Presider: Gabrielle Parkin, Case Western Reserve Univ.
Fowl Play: Birds and Social Bonds in “Tereus, Procne, and Philomela”
Jeffery G. Stoyanoff, Spring Hill College
Animal Bodies, Social Critique, and Equine Medicine in John Gower’s “Tale of Rosiphelee”
Francine McGregor, Arizona State Univ. 
Animal Life and Men of Law in John Gower’s Mirour de l’omme and Vox clamantis
Natalie Grinnell, Wofford College
The Kinde Creatures: Fair Trade in the Tale of Adrian and Bardus
Roger Ladd, Univ. of North Carolina–Pembroke

135 SANGREN 1710
Medieval Ecocriticisms: Intersections (A Roundtable) 
Sponsor: Medieval Ecocriticisms 
Organizer: Heide Estes, Monmouth Univ. 
Presider: Heide Estes
Material Subjects, Vulnerable Bodies
Richard H. Godden, Loyola Univ. New Orleans
Queer Waste in Wynnere and Wastoure
Micah Goodrich, Univ. of Connecticut 
Environmental Diversity and the Cultural Terrain of a Temporal Monolith: 
Eosturmonath, Nisan, and the Paschal Table
Miriamne Ara Krummel, Univ. of Dayton
Reverberations from the Sibyl’s Cave: Tracking the Ecology, Materiality, and 
Authority of the Female Prophet across Medieval Europe
Alan S. Montroso, George Washington Univ.


Thursday, 7:30 pm

165 BERNHARD BROWN & GOLD ROOM
Wolves Outside, Inside, and at the Medieval Door 
Organizer: Laura D. Gelfand, Utah State Univ. 
Presider: Kathleen Ashley, Univ. of Southern Maine
Hagiography and Historical Encounters with Canis Lupus Lupus
Laura D. Gelfand
Saint Norbert and the Wolves of Prémontré
Ellen M. Shortell, Massachusetts College of Art and Design 
Wolf versus Lion: The Princely Avatars of Orleans and Burgundy
Elizabeth J. Moodey, Vanderbilt Univ.


Friday, 10:00

214 BERNHARD 210
Landscape Approaches to the Plague 
Sponsor: Contagions: Society for Historic Infectious Disease Studies 
Organizer: Michelle Ziegler, Independent Scholar 
Presider: Philip Slavin, Univ. of Kent
Plague in the Sixth-Century Bavarian Landscape
Michelle Ziegler
44.7%: New archaeological Evidence for the Impact of the Black Death in 
England and Its Implications for Future Research
Carenza Lewis, Univ. of Lincoln 
Heterogeneous Immunological Landscapes and Medieval Plague
Fabian Crespo, Univ. of Louisville

216 BERNHARD 212
Green Spenser 
Sponsor: Spenser at Kalamazoo 
Organizer: Sean Henry, Univ. of Victoria; Rachel E. Hile, Indiana Univ.-Purdue Univ.–Fort Wayne; Susannah B. Monta, Univ. of Notre Dame 
Presider: Thomas Herron, East Carolina Univ.
Opening Remarks
David Lee Miller, Univ. of South Carolina–Columbia
“And straight they saw the raging surges reard”: Watery Wildernesses and Narratives of National Self in Spenser’s Book II of The Faerie Queene
Amber N. Slaven, Univ. of Louisiana–Lafayette 
Moving Metaphors: Spenser’s Clouds
Archie Cornish, Univ. of Oxford
“Seeking for Daunger and Aduentures” in Spenser’s Gardens
Christine Coch, College of the Holy Cross


Friday, 1:30

231 FETZER 1005
Justice 
Sponsor: International Arthurian Society, North American Branch (IAS/NAB) 
Organizer: Kevin S. Whetter, Acadia Univ. 
Presider: Nicole Clifton, Northern Illinois Univ.
Ruled by Counsel: Arthur, Justice, and the Influence of Merlin in Malory’s Morte Darthur
Russell L. Keck, Harding Univ.
Besieged Ladies: Thomas Malory’s Lyonesse and the Paston Letters
Kristin Bovaird-Abbo, Univ. of Northern Colorado 
Northern Justice: Morgause’s Sons, Arthur’s Nephews
Katharine Mudd, Northern Illinois Univ.
Environmental Justice in Arthurian Romance
Michael W. Twomey, Ithaca College

240 SCHNEIDER 1120
Materiality and Place in the Northern World I 
Sponsor: Richard Rawlinson Center for Anglo-Saxon Studies and 
Manuscript Research 
Organizer: Catherine E. Karkov, Univ. of Leeds 
Presider: Jill Frederick, Minnesota State Univ.–Moorhead
“The Gates of Paradise”: (Be)jeweled Borders, Precious Stones, and the Presentation of Paradise in the Early Church
Meg Boulton, Univ. of York
Water, Parchment, Place in Anglo-Saxon Manuscript Illumination
Tina Bawden, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Freie Univ. Berlin 
The Wolf of Winchester
Catherine E. Karkov

267 BERNHARD 158
Mappings II: Medieval Maps, Their Makers and Users 
Organizer: Dan Terkla, Illinois Wesleyan Univ. 
Presider: Rachel Dressler, Univ. at Albany
Seabirds to Starboard: Notes on Norse Navigational Technique
Gaetan Dupont, Cornell Univ.; Oren Falk, Cornell Univ.
The Geography of Devotion in the London Psalter Maps
LauraLee Brott, Univ. of Wisconsin–Madison 
Russian “Old Drawing”: The Problem of Attribution
Alexey Frolov, Institute of World History, Russian Academy of Sciences

272 BERNHARD 210
The Great Transition: Climate, Disease, and Society in the Late Medieval World (A Roundtable) 
Sponsor: Contagions: Society for Historic Infectious Disease Studies 
Organizer: Michelle Ziegler, Independent Scholar 
Presider: Michelle Ziegler
A roundtable discussion with Philip Slavin, Univ. of Kent; Wendy J. Turner, Augusta Univ. ; Carenza Lewis, Univ. of Lincoln; Boris Valentijn Schmid, Univ. i Oslo; 
Christopher P. Atwood, Univ. of Pennsylvania; Timur Khaydarov, Kazan National Research Univ.; and Hendrik Poinar, Ancient DNA Centre, McMaster Univ.


Saturday, 10:00

349 VALLEY I SHILLING LOUNGE
Exile and Arcadia: Space and Sovereignty 
Organizer: Will Eggers, Loomis Chaffee School 
Presider: John P. Sexton, Bridgewater State Univ.
Woods Free from Peril: Exile and Utopia in Shakespeare’s As You Like It
John Morrell, Loomis Chaffee School
Devil Dogs and Hobby Horses: Ritual and Community in The Witch of Edmonton
Jane Wanninger, Bard College at Simon’s Rock 
Early English Exclusion, Exile, and the Other
Will Eggers


Saturday, 1:30

417 SCHNEIDER 1220
Dwelling in the Anglo-Saxon Landscape II: Life, Death, and Wellbeing 
Sponsor: Dept. of Archaeology, Durham Univ. 
Organizer: Sarah J. Semple, Durham Univ. 
Presider: Helen Foxhall Forbes, Durham Univ.
Mortuary Topography and Landscape Perception in Early Medieval Southern England and the near Continent: A Multi-scalar Approach
Kate Mees, Durham Univ.
The Past and the Construction of Identity in the Landscape of Anglo-Saxon England
Adam Goodfellow, Durham Univ. 
“Her Own Place . . . Still Remembered”: Goscelin’s Saintly Architects and the Anglo-Saxon Landscape
Sarah Sutor, Univ. of Illinois–Urbana-Champaign


Saturday, 3:30

452 VALLEY I SHILLING LOUNGE
The Idea of the Garden in Medieval Literature 
Sponsor: Medieval Studies Institute, Indiana Univ.–Bloomington 
Organizer: Shannon Gayk, Indiana Univ.–Bloomington 
Presider: Shannon Gayk
Paradise Not Lost or Longed-For: The Phoenix’s Garden as Heaven’s Earth
Evelyn Reynolds, Indiana Univ.–Bloomington
An Apology for Medicine in Walahfrid Strabo’s De cultura hortorum
Jared Johnson, Centre for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Toronto 
On the Prettiness of Flowers, or, Ornamentation in the Medieval Garden
Isabel Stern, Rutgers Univ.
Response: Lynn Staley, Colgate Univ.


Sunday, 8:30

511 SCHNEIDER 1225
Settlement and Landscape I: Technological Approaches to the Medieval in the Modern 
Organizer: Vicky McAlister, Southeast Missouri State Univ.; Jennifer L. Immich, Metropolitan State Univ. of Denver 
Presider: Terry Barry, Trinity College Dublin, Univ. of Dublin
Socio-economic Changes in the Landscape of Early Medieval Ireland ca. 300–1000
John Tighe, Trinity College Dublin, Univ. of Dublin
Lordly Landscapes: Exploring Castle Siting in the Midlands of Ireland with GIS and Archaeological Survey
Jennifer L. Immich 
Lines in the Landscape? The Expansion and Contraction of the Mac Carthaigh Riabhach
Margaret Smith, St. Louis Univ.


Sunday, 10:30

540 FETZER 1010
Materia Medica: Plants, Animals, and Minerals in Healing 
Sponsor: Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages 
Organizer: William H. York, Portland State Univ. 
Presider: Linda Ehrsam Voigts, Univ. of Missouri–Kansas City
Origins and Ingredients: A Comparison of Early Medieval Remedies
Claire Burridge, Univ. of Cambridge
The Use of the Mandrake in the Early Middle Ages for the Gout, for the Conception, and as an Anesthetic
Arsenio Ferraces-Rodríguez, Univ. da Coruña 
Memory and Materia Medica in Avicenna’s Canon of Medicine: An Attempt at the Reconstruction of the Inner Logic of Application
Shahrzad Irannejad, Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz

551 SCHNEIDER 1255
Hunting for the Animal Subject in Anglo-Saxon England (A Roundtable) 
Organizer: Matthew E. Spears, Cornell Univ. 
Presider: Matthew E. Spears
A roundtable discussion with Benjamin Weber, Princeton Univ.; Heather M. Flowers, Minnesota State Univ.–Mankato; Danielle Ruether-Wu, Cornell Univ.; Kaitlin Griggs, Carleton Univ.; and Robert Stanton, Boston College.

Please comment, or tweet at Medieval Ecocritic (@medvlecocritic) if there's another paper or session that should be on this list. Thanks!

Thursday, December 8, 2016

Teaching Environmental Issues (After the Election)

Three years ago, I designed Ecocriticism and Medieval England (syllabus here, if you're interested), a senior-level, interdisciplinary capstone course for all majors. This semester's section has been interesting, given the election results that dropped into the middle.

Rather than addressing Trump directly, I talked about the Republican party platform section on the environment and the environmental consequences.

The week before the election, I'd been talking about the monstrous figures in Africa and Asia on the Hereford Mappa Mundi and how they shaped Europeans' attitudes during later travel and colonization while trying to ignore the Trump sticker on the laptop of a student sitting front and center.

Wikipedia has a hi-res image of the whole map

The morning after the election, as I made my way to campus sleep-deprived and stunned, I knew I still had to teach that student, and others who didn't share my pretty far-left politics.

I decided  to be honest. I told the students I was deeply dismayed by the election results, that I'd been in tears a lot, but that I knew everyone didn't share my views. I said the classroom remained a place for respect for all, and for civil discourse.

There's a social work student who sits in the back, a little older than traditional students, and she gave me a nod, a look of compassion. The rest of the class breathed a little easier. 

A student who'd been mostly quiet asked, in a voice of anguish, what now? And I said, my own voice cracking with emotion, "keep fighting." I asked what she was going to do after graduation, she said she didn't know; I said: Go into politics. Make your voice heard.

One of the course assignments was for the students to take on a (small) environmental project for the duration of the semester. Some students bought reusable bottles or mugs for the water or coffee, one group car-pooled to school from their off-campus house, others turned off lights or committed to recycling more or unplugged things that drain power even when off.

Last night was the last class meeting. Here's some of what I said, more or less:
You all come from different majors, and you have different reasons for taking this course. Some of your are interested in environmental issues, some of you saw a course that fit your schedule, some of you saw a hybrid course that meets only once a week and thought it would be easy. It's a challenge bringing such a diverse group into conversation. It takes work on the part of the professor, but it also takes good will and cooperation on your part, as students, and you brought that to the classroom. Thank you for that.
I asked you to think about a lot of unfamiliar things: medieval history and literature, ecocriticism, environmental issues. I asked you to change your lives, albeit in a small way. These are not easy things to ask of students, but you engaged.
Teaching environmental criticism is not, in my mind, just an intellectual exercise. It is an explicit act of resistance and activism. In asking you to thinking about how the people of medieval England wrote about the natural world in literary and documentary texts, and their own relationships with animals and the environment, as well as with other human beings, I have also been asking you to think about contemporary ideas about the environment. 
Ecofeminists have observed that medieval writers wrote explicitly that women were more closely connected with nature than men, less rational, less capable; aristocratic women were often given by their fathers to their husbands in an economic arrangement, and their purpose (like Kate Middleton's) was to produce heirs. Their fecund bodies were a resource controlled by men.
Ecofeminists didn't go quite far enough, because they didn't recognize that the bodies of peasants, male and female, were also seen as resources controlled by the aristocracy as sources of labor and excess production. This enabled lords to evict peasants from farmland so they could graze sheep when wool became more valuable than food, rendering them homeless.
Thinking about the Middle Ages and the environment is valuable, in my mind, in two important ways.
Understanding medieval technologies can help us to better understand our own. It takes more than 700 hours to spin the thread needed to make enough fabric for a simple peasant dress. That contrast with the speed with which garment factories today can churn out fast fashion gives some perspective. Understanding something about what it takes to heat a house, or for that matter build it, to travel, to grow and harvest food, to create a manuscript -- the sheer amount of hours of labor required -- helps us to see contemporary farms and homes and books and cars in a different light.
The other issue is that our attitudes toward our "natural" surroundings have a very long history. They are deeply embedded in our culture. We need to understand those attitudes, and understand how they shape the way we build communities and organize transportation and commerce today, and understand how long-standing their hold on our culture has been, in order to get a sense of how we got here -- and how we might be able to make change and envision a better future.
We need to change. We need to make change happen, and we need to do it fast. We are already beyond 400 ppm, a threshold some climate scientists think portends disaster. Wildfires in Kentucky and California are a result of droughts caused by humans. Most of you directly experienced the flooding from Hurricane Sandy. 
You all need to go out into your communities and, like a pebble that drops into a pond, make a ripple. And if enough of you make that ripple, it can turn into a wave.

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

CFP: Medieval Ecocriticisms at Leeds

Medieval Ecocriticisms is seeking papers for a session to be held at the International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 3-6, 2017.

Each year, the Congress chooses a special thematic strand; this year, that strand is "Otherness." Medieval Ecocriticisms seeks papers or position statements that combine an environmental or ecological approach with a consideration of "otherness" in some area of Medieval Studies, construed as broadly as possible in terms of time, space, and discipline. The session might include three or four 15- to 20-minute papers, or five to seven position statements of eight to ten minutes, depending on how many people are interested in participating, as well as a respondent.

The IMC call for papers refers to "otherness" particularly in terms of human interactions with other human beings. This session seeks papers or position statements that also or instead consider relationships with or among animals, objects, dwellings, mountains, the sea, and/or other non-human others.

Please submit proposals Heide Estes (hestes@monmouth.edu) by September 1. Include title, abstract of 250 words, academic affiliation, audio-visual needs, and information about any need for accommodations  Please let me know if you are flexible in regards to presenting a paper or position statement, or serving as a respondent, or if you would prefer one or another of the options.

More information about the International Medieval Congress:
Call for Papers
Guidelines for Submissions (with information about location and anticipated registration fee)

Please feel free to email with questions.


Thursday, May 12, 2016

Environment and Ecocriticism at Kalamazoo

A list of Kalamazoo sessions of potential interest if you're trying to follow current work on environmental studies and/or ecocriticism in the field:

Thursday

10:00 a.m.
37 Medieval Ecocriticisms: Why the Middle Ages Matter

1:30 p.m.
51 Wild and Tamed Spaces in Middle English Literature
86 Animal Languages

3:30 p.m.
110 Animals and Power: Human-Animal Interactions and the Representations of Social Order in Medieval Research and in Teaching the Middle Ages
130 Holy Landscapes and Sacred Space

Friday

10:00 a.m.
200 Romance Ecologies I: Tame Beasts/Wild Men
209 Urban Space and Urban Resources in Medieval Central Europe

1:30 p.m.
250 Warfare and Conflict Landscapes in Britain and Ireland, 1100-1250: New Approaches
260 Romance Ecologies II: Alien Terrain
264 Elemental Approaches I: Earth

3:30 p.m.
279 Romance Ecologies III: Decay
317 Elemental Approaches II: Fire

Saturday

10:00 a.m.
376 Ecocritical Outlaws

1:30 p.m.
429 Elemental Approaches III: Water I

3:30 p.m.
442 Places and Spaces in the Pearl-Poems
482 Elemental Approaches IV: Water II

If I've missed any, please let me know in the comments and I'll edit them in.

Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Medieval Ecology at MLA

Medieval ecocritics: if you're attending the Modern Language Association meeting in Austin, you might want to check out this session:

594. Becoming Human: Medieval

Saturday, 9 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Lone Star C, JW Marriott
Presiding: Ruth Evans, Saint Louis Univ.

Speakers: Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, George Washington Univ.; Holly Crocker, Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia; Rebecca Davis, Univ. of California, Irvine; Allan Mitchell, Univ. of Victoria; Myra Seaman, Coll. of Charleston

Session Description:

Medieval studies has long been invested in exploring the complex dynamics at stake in the themes of human/animal and human/machine and in the modes of becoming human. Panelists discuss the place and status of the human and medieval humanism in the context of the recent posthuman turn in literary studies.